Windows 7 Uncertainty?

eWeek’s Debra Donston discusses her concerns about Windows 7 and Microsoft’s approach to transparency about the new OS.

“So, when I read the Ars Technica headline today, March 6, "Windows 7 RTM: July? August? September? October?" I got frustrated. No, make that mad.

I’ve been at eWEEK through a great many Windows releases. Especially lately, I’ve seen how Microsoft has based release dates around "when the product is ready." I’ve seen speculation about release dates. I’ve seen release dates bob and weave. I’ve seen release dates miss.

A client OS upgrade isn’t a no-brainer on any level. Microsoft, do yourself and your customers a favor. Be open about the ROI of Windows 7; be forthcoming about the benefits of Vista versus Windows 7; give users a reasonable upgrade path (is it really easier to go from Vista to Windows 7 than from XP to Windows 7?); set a release date; and stick to that release date.”

Read the entire post here

A lot of the discussion in this article is very misinformed, Microsoft has stated the theme behind Windows 7, the most obvious being its a quality driven release. The Windows 7 Engineering and Windows 7 Team blog’s have also become very important starting points for really breaking down walls around Windows 7 and delivering accurate information to customers. In fact, Microsoft has been so transparent that its quite amazing at times, Steven Sinofsky responding to customer emails and in technology forums would be considered a deep breath of fresh air to how Microsoft engages with its customer base.

To answer some of the qualms:

1. Be open about the ROI of Windows 7; be forthcoming about the benefits of Vista versus Windows 7;
Windows 7 Enterprise Edition Customer Benefits
http://windowsteamblog.com/blogs/business/archive/2009/02/11/windows-7-enterprise-edition-customer-benefits.aspx

2. give users a reasonable upgrade path (is it really easier to go from Vista to Windows 7 than from XP to Windows 7?);
> It is in fact an easy to do upgrade, Microsoft has not overhauled the kernel like Vista to make it easier for applications and device drivers to transition with this release., I have been running Windows 7 since alpha, new options like the ability upgrade from 64 bit editions of Vista to Windows 7 64 bit is great. The new Anytime Upgrade is more convenient, no need to be online, just acquire a product key and enter it and you have an edition with more features in less than 7 minutes. Each edition is more distinctive carrying more features and options, Windows 7 Professional for instance includes Domain Join and Media Center, that’s based on customer feedback.

3. set a release date; and stick to that release date.
Microsoft has said this time and time again, 3 years after the General availability of Windows Vista. What more could you want? Stop believing in speculation from rumour sites. Not because someone reads the expiry date on the ‘Windows 7 About Dialog’ means it leads to some possible theory. Windows 7 is on a good path right now, yes there has been some concern about availability of new builds to testers, but I am sure that will be satisfied soon with the imminent release of Release Candidate.

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